Blogging blues

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I’m going to be completely honest: I’m feeling a bit deflated at the moment.  When I started Girl, Reading last year I promised myself I wouldn’t spend too much of my time writing self-indulgent posts about the blogging process, but right now I feel I need to.  I absolutely love having a blog, partly because I enjoy writing and partly because I get an enormous amount of pleasure from sharing my passion for books with others; but it’s incredibly hard to stay motivated when the words into which you’ve put so much effort reach so few people.

I’ve read some really lovely articles by other bloggers encouraging their fellow writers not to worry too much about how many people are reading or following their blog – but in all honesty it’s difficult not to!  I’ve also read many pieces about increasing your blog traffic, and I dutifully spend the requisite amount of time choosing tags, including relevant images and so on.  I certainly love interacting with other bloggers too, not out of a “follow me and I’ll follow you” mentality but because I genuinely love talking to other people about books and getting to know people I never would have known if it hadn’t been for our shared passion.  It’s strange, then, that despite the great online chats, blogging can at times feel like a bit of an isolating experience when you put your heart and soul into a review only to see over the subsequent hours and days that so few readers have even found it.

I’d love to get my book obsession out there to more people to make it feel worthwhile, and some advice on how to do this would be most welcome!  Everyone I’ve met so far through the blog has been utterly lovely, so I’m not afraid to ask you wonderful people for some help.  I also want to say a huge thank you to everyone who reads my blog and who takes the time to talk with me about what I’ve written; it means the world, so thank you!

 

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16 thoughts on “Blogging blues

  1. I love your blog. I also find it really useful. As a writer, it’s always really handy to get insights on how readers react to books. Sometimes we can get a bit trapped inside the creative process and it’s nice to see things analysed from the outside in, rather than the way we look at our own works – from the inside out.

    Also, I meant what I said on Twitter! If you want to, I think you should give writing your own novel a try. With the amount of books you’ve read, your brain must be a verbal arsenal. You’ve gained an almost instinctive insight into what works, and what doesn’t work. Make this work for you!

    ~ Ciaran Smith

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for your comment, it’s lovely to know you enjoy my blog, and also interesting to hear how you read it from a writer’s point of view. I’ve thought many times about writing a novel and have actually started a couple of times, but my concentration span is appalling and I find myself bored with my own ideas way before I can finish! I think it may be something I come back to one day though for sure. Thank you so much for your thoughts 🙂

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      1. I know how that feels. Sometimes when it’s time to write, it’s so tempting to eat cookies and just read a nice book instead. Might help to have a muse though, if you really want to write. I’d be happy to read your stuff, and you can read mine. We can support each other!

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      2. That’s a really lovely offer, thank you 🙂 If I do manage to start writing seriously any time soon I’ll let you know. And I’m always more than happy to help you out too, if there’s anything you’d like me to read for you please do give me a shout!

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  2. I love your blog. I also find it really useful. As a writer, it’s always really handy to get insights on how readers react to books. Sometimes we can get a bit trapped inside the creative process and it’s nice to see things analysed from the outside in, rather than the way we look at our own works – from the inside out.

    Also, I meant what I said! If you want to, I think you should give writing your own novel a try. With the amount of books you’ve read, your brain must be a verbal arsenal. You’ve gained an almost instinctive insight into what works, and what doesn’t work. Make this work for you!

    Like

  3. I’m sorry you are going through a rough patch with blogging right now. I often feel the same way when one of my posts does not get many views as I would hope. I’ve had my ups and downs with blogging over the 9 months I’ve been blogging, but only within the past 2 months have I stopped obsessing with views, likes, and followers. Honestly, I’ve started to think of it like a diary… especially when I post book reviews that don’t do as well. However, here are a few things I’ve learned along the way that will increase the traffic on your blog…

    1) Blog hopping & interaction – this doesn’t mean you go and follow a bunch of people that you don’t want to in the hopes that they will follow you. Go through the reader on wordpress and try out some different tags. Try Book Blog, Book Blogger, Bookworm, Historical Fiction (or any other genres you are interested in) and start there. Read, comment, and follow any blogs that truly interest you, that way you are interacting with other bloggers who share similar interests with you. I’ve found that if you are not active in the community, odds are you will get little to no traffic on your site.

    2) Twitter is your friend – Be active on twitter. Follow people in the bookish community. Tweet book related things. Post your blog posts on twitter.

    3) Participate in weekly memes (Top Ten Tuesday, Top 5 Wednesday, etc) and book tags – I only participate in the ones where the topic interests me, but these are a great way to get traffic.

    4) Read books that other bloggers are reading – I’m not saying to start reading books that don’t appeal to you for the sake of blogging, but check out what books are all the rage and try to read and review 1-2 a month or so.

    I hope these are helpful.

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    1. Thank you so much for all your thoughts, it really means a lot 🙂 I really like the idea of thinking of a blog like a diary, I think that’s a positive way of viewing it. A couple of people have mentioned Twitter to me; it’s not something I use a lot but I think I need to do so more as it seems to be a good way to meet and interact with a wide range of people. Thank you again for helping me out! X

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Its a balance of writing and getting something back. For me, it took time, writing nine or ten posts a month and making firm friends with people. Most of my comments come from solid friends I have made, every so often drop on a reblog of a post you have come across as well to keep people visitor numbers up. Like others have said link to Twitter and such, retweet others work and such.

    Most of all I would say think of your writing as a portfolio you are building over time and keep positive, I get less than 20,000 hits a year whereas most of my friends are getting that in three or four months, it is demoralising sometimes but your words can open doors to new adventures.

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    1. Thank you for you thoughts! It’s been really interesting and enlightening to hear people’s feedback on this post, in fact it’s been reassuring to hear that others feel demoralised at times too. I love talking to other bookworms online so I’m trying to do more of that, and concentrating on enjoying writing. Thank you for commenting 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. We are all in the same boat at one time or another but it means we all understand each other’s feelings about it. It is always great to find people with good content and not just quickly hashed posts and an obsession with themsleves…keep up your writing and good things will happen.

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